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Curiosity Forum: Beginning Ornithology (5/7/14) – 7 pm Freight Depot

South Cambridge resident Steve Sanford will present a talk this Wednesday, May 7th at the Frieght Depot behind Hubbard Hall on Beginning Ornithology – An Introduction to the Science of

Curiosity Forum/Book Talk: Civil War Sites in NYC with author Bill Morgan (5/1/14)

May 1, 2014 at 7 p.m.   This event will take place in the Freight Depot Theater at Hubbard Hall. Join us for a discussion of Bill Morgan’s book, The Civil

Curiosity Forum: Beginning Ornithology (5/7/14) – 7 pm Freight Depot

blue-jay-adk-life-rr-smallSouth Cambridge resident Steve Sanford will present a talk this Wednesday, May 7th at the Frieght Depot behind Hubbard Hall on Beginning Ornithology – An Introduction to the Science of Birds.

Steve is a professional wildlife ecologist (retired) and artist and hopes the program will be useful for novice and experienced birders alike – or for anyone just curious about the natural world. He will describe why birds are “designed” the way they are and how they make their livings. He will present the basics of bird identification and also how to get the most from a bird feeder. Most important, he will talk about why we should learn about the birds around us.

His PowerPoint presentation will include many beautiful photographs by Fort Edward veterinarian Gordon Ellmers. Admission is free and there is no pre-registration. You can view some of Steve’s amazing work of decoys, bird illustrations and boat restoration at www.stevenjaysanford.com.

Curiosity Forum events are a partnership of Battenkill Books, Hubbard Hall, and Leslie Parke Studio. All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.

Curiosity Forum/Book Talk: Civil War Sites in NYC with author Bill Morgan (5/1/14)

May 1, 2014 at 7 p.m.

 

This event will take place in the Freight Depot Theater at Hubbard Hall.

Join us for a discussion of Bill Morgan’s book, The Civil War Lover’s Guide to New York City. 

Few Americans associate New York City with the Civil War, but the most populated metropolitan area in the nation, then and now, is filled with scores of monuments, historical sites, and resources directly related to those four turbulent years. Veteran author Bill Morgan s The Civil War Lover s Guide to New York City examines more than 150 of these largely overlooked and often forgotten historical gems. New York City has always been full of surprises. Not only was it largely sympathetic to the South, but its citizens twice voted overwhelmingly against Abraham Lincoln and the mayor refused to fly the American flag over city hall on the day of his inauguration. The USS Monitor, the country s first ironclad, was designed and built here, and General Meade sent troops to the city straight from the Gettysburg battlefield to put down the bloodiest civil rebellion in our history.

 

By the time the war ended, New York had provided more men, equipment, and supplies for the Union than any other city in the North. Morgan s book takes readers on a nearly endless journey of historical discovery. Walk inside the church where Stonewall Jackson was baptized (which still holds services), visit the building where Lincoln delivered his famous Cooper Union Speech, and marvel that the church built by the great abolitionist Henry Ward Beecher is still used for worship. A dozen Civil War era forts still stand (the star-shaped bastion upon which the Statue of Liberty rests was a giant supply depot), and one of them sent relief supplies to besieged Fort Sumter in Charleston. Visit the theater where Dixie was first performed and the house where Stephen Crane wrote The Red Badge of Courage. After the war, New York honored the brave men who fought by erecting some of the nation s most beautiful memorials in honor of William T. Sherman, Admiral David Farragut, and Abraham Lincoln. These and many others still grace parks and plazas around the city. Ulysses S. Grant adopted New York as his home and is buried here in the largest mausoleum in America (which was also the most-visited monument in the country). See the homes where many generals, including Winfield Scott, George McClellan, Daniel Sickles, and even Robert E. Lee, once lived. Complete with full-color photos and maps, Morgan s lavishly illustrated and designed The Civil War Lover s Guide to New York City is a must-have book for every student of the Civil War and for every visitor to New York City.

 

Bill Morgan is an American writer, known for his work as an archivist and bibliographer for popular figures such as Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Abbie Hoffman, and Timothy Leary. Morgan was Allen Ginsberg’s personal archivist and bibliographer. Over their 20-year relationship, Morgan became quite close to Ginsberg and wrote his biography, “I Celebrate Myself: The Somewhat Private Life of Allen Ginsberg” (2006). Morgan has written extensively on the Beat generation and its key figures.

 

Curiosity Forum events are a partnership of Battenkill BooksHubbard Hall, andLeslie Parke Studio. All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.

 

Book List
$18.95

ISBN-13: 9781611211221
Availability: On Our Shelves Now at Battenkill Books
Published: Savas Beatie, 10/2013


 

Location:

 

Freight Depot Theater, Hubbard Hall
25 East Main St.
Cambridge

,

New York
12816

Curiosity Forum/Book Talk: Lily with author Marcia Reiss (4/13/14)

Sunday, April 13, 2014
4:00 pm
Freight Depot Theater, Hubbard Hall
FREE (Donations in support of the series gratefully accepted.)

Lily by Marcia Reiss

The lily is a flower of contradictions. It represents both life and death, appearing at weddings and funerals. In their pure white form, lilies are a symbol of innocence, chastity, and purity of heart, but in contrast, the highly fragrant and intensely colored orange lilies symbolize passion.

In Lily, Marcia Reiss explores these paradoxes, tracing the flower’s cultural significance in art, literature, religion, and popular entertainment throughout history. Reiss journeys from the tomb carvings of ancient Egypt to the paintings of Claude Monet, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Salvador Dali, exploring the lily as a subject of fascination and obsession. Unearthing many absorbing facts and fables about the blossom, she examines its use in cuisine and reveals them to have been a source of food and medicine in China for centuries. While Reiss focuses her attention on true lilies and the ornamental hybrids breeders have derived from them, she also provides extensive information about a wide variety of popular lilies, including daylilies, lilies of the valley, water lilies, and calla lilies. Filled with striking illustrations of these gorgeous plants, “Lily” is a book for gardeners and lily admirers alike.

“…there are fascinating accounts of the plant in Native American myth, culture and cookery and of the annual Giglio festival, imported from Italy to New York, in which enormously tall towers decorated with lilies are paraded through the streets. Reiss is also good on the various uses of the word ‘lily’, most notoriously in the racist Lily-White Movement, which held sway in the Republican Party from the end of the American Civil War until 1933.

In addition, the illustrations in this volume are particularly fine: an Easter card depicting a fluffy chick harnessed to a tiny wagon bearing a spray of lilies of the valley; an early-17th-century drawing of a Turkish porter guarding a seraglio, flanked by towering red Turk’s cap lilies; Bette Davies in a  spectacular dress decorated with huge calla lilies; and a positively indecent sculpture of Saint-Pierre’s Paul and Virginie afloat in a pool of water lilies.” — The Spectator

Lily and Pine are beautifully produced, with an old-fashioned and wonderfully solid feel to them; they are well illustrated with material from a very wide range of sources, and bound at a higher quality than the general run of hardback books, especially given the modest price. I can see them becoming collectors’ items.” – Gardens Illustrated

Curiosity Forum events are a partnership of Battenkill Books, Hubbard Hall, and Leslie Parke Studio. All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.